4 Reasons Your Hair Stops Growing!

Many of us want nothing more than long, healthy hair, which is why it’s so frustrating when it just refuses to grow! Even more annoying, though, is that it stays the same length, and yet we still see our roots emerge when it’s time to color our hair. Our hair may be growing, but where is it going? Why isn’t it getting any longer?

  1. Are you getting trims often enough?

    Some women try to hang on to as much length as possible by avoiding haircuts, and yet they gain no length. We all have a maximum length our hair can reach according to our current regime. This is where your ends simply begin to break instead of continue to remain strong and healthy. Until you change your existing habits and products used on your hair, nothing will change about your hair. Trim the split ends, use thermal protection and safe thermal tools, and use the right hair mask and treatment to nourish your hair, because clearly you’ve plateaued and nothing will change unless you make some changes yourself!

  2. Genetics

    Whether we have pinpointed it or not, we all have an individual hair cycle growth phase in which their hair has potential to reach its longest. This is the maximum length that hair could possibly reach without being cut or damaged. “This does not mean that hair always stops growing once it reaches a specific length, but once a certain amount of time has passed. The growth phase is largely determined by genetics and typically lasts between two and six years.

  3. Age

    Aging brings with it a host of life complications, not the least of all is our hair. As we get older, chances are our hair is weaker. Years of heat styling and lightening can build up to create major damage. Studies have shown that the biology of hair can change, and the growth stage may shorten. This means that hair could begin shedding faster, making it appear thinner and shorter. For instance, if you have a five year anagen (growing) period, a single strand of hair will continue growing for five years before it will go into ‘resting’ phase. However, as we get older, the anagen phase is known to shorten, meaning hair will grow for less time before it enters the resting phase and ultimately sheds to make room for new (short) strands. Additionally, oil production on the scalp often begins to slow down after age 45, so hair may be less hydrated and appear coarser, making it more susceptible to damage and breakage.

  4. Breakage

    Sorry to break it to you all: Your hair may appear to be not growing, but in reality, it could be breaking once it reaches a certain length. Showering, brushing, styling, and chemically processing hair can all lead to major split ends and breakage. Handling hair too roughly, using uncovered hair elastics, and brushing too often can cause dryness and brittleness. Chemical processes can cause hair to be overprocessed and lose elasticity and moisture. Since hair grows about half an inch each month, if it is continuing to break off at about that same rate, you will see little to no growth.

  5. calura-model

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